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5 Tips From 5 Billionaires To Young People

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Like the rest of us, billionaires have mistakes and regrets. And that becomes advice for young people.

There are billions of people in the world, and only a fraction of them are billionaires.

What distinguishes billionaires’ thought processes from others?

What is their secret to outstanding success?

What is their belief system?

What gives them the energy to pursue ambitious goals?

However, the above questions seem to have too many answers.

But one thing is very profound: “Like the rest of us, billionaires always have regrets”.

In an interview conducted by CNBC, there are 5 biggest regrets billionaires have shared.

1. Not participating in great opportunities

Tim Draper, a venture capitalist, advises those who want to be successful like me: “Pick a goal and follow it.”

In investing, great risks always have well-deserved rewards.

Seize the big opportunities, which Mr. Draper used to miss.

He was once interested in investing in Facebook.

However, for some reason, he withdrew from the deal.

And this is what he regrets most because after that, the value of Facebook has increased many times.

2. Not living in the present

Chip Wilson, who has founded several retail apparel companies, most notably yoga-inspired sportswear company Lululemon Athletica, has a great mantra: “Live in the moment.”

But it took him several years to get there.

“I have lived my life in the past, in anger about what I have done in the past, or I am living my life in the future,”

He added that he never appreciated the people he was with or the things he accomplished in the present moment.

As soon as Mr. Wilson changed his mind, he began to say to himself, “I’m living a wonderful life.”

And that helped him move forward by thinking about how he could be a better person and make a difference in the world.

3. Not starting early enough

Despite their success, many billionaires regret not pursuing their goals earlier in life.

Mr. Peter Hargreaves is the founder of Hargreaves Lansdown, the largest financial services company in the UK.

When asked if he would do differently if he could start his business again, he replied: “Well, maybe I would start sooner.”

As Ron Sim, a Singaporean billionaire who built OSIM International, a maker of high-end massage chairs, said:

“There is never a right time to start a business or have a baby.

But if you don’t do that, nothing will happen.

So don’t wait for the right moment.

Do it as soon as possible.

4. Not taking risks

Billionaires are also human.

They weren’t born the biggest risk-takers, despite all their fears.

In an interview with CNBC, Jack Cowin, founder of Competitive Foods Australia (the company that runs Burger King Australia brand as Hungry Jack’s), shared what he would do differently if he could return to the age of 21.

 

“I will be bolder,” he said.

I will take more risks.

The fear of failure makes you more conscious.

The fear of debt makes you more conscious.

So I’ll have more confidence in myself that I can find my way through the maze.”

 

However, it is important to strike a balance between boldness and caution, or else you will fail, he added.

5. Not changing fast enough

“Every day, you have to change,” says Frank Hasenfratz, founder of auto parts maker Linamar.

If you don’t change, you will die.”

Mr. Hasenfratz is well aware of the changing world and the need to adapt to changing conditions.

To illustrate his point, Mr. Hasenfratz said he once checked a chamber of commerce document from 1964, when he started his own business.

At the time, the document listed about 100 manufacturing plants.

But now, he said, nearly all of them are gone.

“I’ve been here for 60 years.

And if you’re not afraid, if you don’t think tomorrow you have to do better, you have to get another product or a higher-end product, you’re not going to last long.”

 

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Tips & Tricks

5 best investments to make in 2021

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5 best investments tips of 2021

After a tumultuous 2020, in terms of both the economy and financial markets, what are the best investments for 2021?

  • Cash

The stock market is assessed to still have positive developments in 2021. However, it is difficult for the market to repeat the profitable performance of 2020.

That doesn’t mean the market will plunge in 2021. But it may be time to adjust expectations. And keeping a reserve of cash is a reasonable choice this new year.

Cash serves a much more important purpose in this investment environment as one of the best investments, which is to provide liquidity.

  • Stocks

No one can be sure which way the stock market will go up in 2021, but investing in stocks is always an average choice.

With the potential for economic growth and inflation to increase in the coming year, certain sectors may become worth investing in.

Certain commodities such as industrial metals and agricultural products appear to have good risk/reward ratios in 2021. That implies inflationary pressures, as the global economy begins to return to normal usually new and input prices increase.

2021 is also seen as an important year for people before retirement, after the ‘warning shot’ 2020. Those who are about to retire need to take into account how much money they have accumulated and give it absolute priority. Don’t spend that much money on a place where there’s not as much uncertainty as the stock market.

Another stock area to consider is biotechnology, which represents the cutting-edge healthcare industry. With the effectiveness of a COVID-19 vaccine still in the “too early to say” stage, biotech could continue to be a strong area in 2021 regardless of the overall market.

  • Real Estate

The sector appears to be a mixed bag going into 2021, with consistent increases in residential property prices and instability in the commercial property market. But that’s exactly why, why it might be worth revisiting next year.

Commercial real estate has been negatively impacted by a massive move towards hiring remote workers. Office buildings and many major downtown areas have seen vacancy rates rise sharply, while retail space has been affected by tens of thousands of store closures. However, one year’s misfortunes frequently lead to new investing chances in subsequent years.

Yet another reason to consider investing in real estate is a game against the stock market. Real estate often performs strongly during stock market declines, as investors seek alternative stock investments. Since real estate returns are comparable to the stock market over the past few decades, real estate serves as a natural alternative to stocks in the equity space.

  • Debt repayment

Whether the economy rises or falls in 2021, the experience of 2020, will be a cautionary tale. Millions of workers lost their jobs, tens of thousands lost their businesses, and the stock market made an impressive recovery from the shock of late winter.

The point is, life is unpredictable. At the start of 2020, the stock market was at a record high, housing prices rose, and unemployment was at a record low. General comments at the beginning of the year are smooth sailing ahead.

If 2021 turns out to be as unpredictable as 2020 and even more likely to happen, reducing or paying off debt will be one of the best investments you can make. You may not be able to afford to carry around a 20% interest credit card or even a low-interest home credit line if your job or business is in jeopardy in 2021.

Also, paying with a credit card at 20% interest would be like being locked into a 20% return on investment for several years. Paying off or paying off debt isn’t preparing for the worst, either. But looking at it positively is a preparation for the best.

  • Invest in yourself

Investing in yourself is generally the best long-term strategy. It offers the opportunity to increase your earning potential, which will have a big impact on any other investing activities you engage in.

2020 is proving to be a difficult year for those in at least a dozen different professions. Investing in yourself can be a way to add an important skill that will keep you in your current job or move into another field.

Investing in yourself doesn’t have to be off-limits to improving your career prospects. You can also put your money into other areas of your life, such as improving your health or learning how to invest better. You either will have the potential to improve your long-term financial situation as well as your quality of life.

 

 

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Tips & Tricks

3 Investment tips for success from Canadian billionaires

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Canadian billionaires don’t get nearly as much attention as similarly rich Americans from the US.

One reason is that there are so much media in the world in America. This has resulted in a huge amount of attention being focused on these billionaires, especially attention seekers. Many American billionaires, like billionaire Warren Buffett, end up making such huge fortunes that we can’t help but notice.

Many of Canada’s top billionaire families are still doing business regularly, quietly building huge fortunes in long-standing businesses. Let’s take a closer look at three ways Canadian billionaires have built their fortunes.

Focus on staples

Many Canadian top billionaires made their fortunes focusing on staples; these are the kinds of things you consume every day.

The food-focused Weston family has since grown into Loblaw Co, Canada’s largest food retailer, including corporate and franchise supermarkets operating under 22 market and regional segment banners, as well as such as pharmacies, banks and apparel. The family fortune also includes Weston Foods, one of North America’s leading bakeries, as well as numerous real estate properties. There’s nothing appealing about any of these businesses, but they generate decent total returns over time.

Loblaw stock has quietly become an excellent stock over a long period of time. Over the past 10 years, if you reinvest all your dividends, the stock has grown at a 9.71% annualized rate. That’s enough to turn an initial $10,000 investment into something worth more than $25,000.

Although Loblaw doesn’t have much room for expansion right now, the company still has growth paths. It can gain market share by improving online ordering options. And it could move into other business areas, as it has with financial services and real estate.

Diversification

Many of Canada’s richest people made their fortunes focusing on the family business, pursuing outside investments only after they were already extremely wealthy. That never happened to Jim Pattison, a billionaire living in Vancouver who has practiced diversification since the early days of his empire.

Today, the Jim Pattison Group owns properties such as car dealerships, grocery stores, outdoor advertising, radio stations, and food production. It also has stakes in several major Canadian companies. None of these assets are particularly attractive, but Pattison’s long-term focus and relentless drive forward have earned him an estimated net worth of $5 billion.

However, not everything Mr. Pattison touches turns to gold. But his diversification ensures all losses are manageable.

Long-term orientation

The little secret of many of the top billionaire families is that they invested decades before they actually became rich.

Take, for example, the Richardson family, which has quietly built up an estimated fortune of more than $6 billion. The family began when Mr. James Richardson emigrated from Ireland in the 1820s. He and his sons founded the company in 1857. It eventually moved to its current home in Winnipeg in the early 20th century. and the family has focused on growth ever since.

It’s hard to have that kind of long-term thinking, especially in these present days. There are simply too many great things for us to spend money on. But as the Richardsons have demonstrated, that kind of long-term approach will make you – and your heirs – astonishingly rich.

 

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4 ways billionaires manage their wealth

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Philanthropy is one of the ways billionaires manage their own wealth.

Billionaires always know how to create material wealth and have a plan to preserve it. Here’s how billionaires manage their fortunes.

Billionaires Start a business

Research shows that 917 self-made billionaires have created more than $3.6 trillion in wealth globally. 23% of those billionaires started their first venture before the age of 30, and 68% did so before turning 40. For centuries, entrepreneurship in America and Europe spurred the first wave of innovation in modern history. However, wealth creation is cyclical.

Billionaires Create Wealth

Billionaires exhibit similar personality traits, including an intelligent risk-taking appetite, a strong focus on business, and a strong work ethic. However, they built their fortunes in different ways.

In the US, for example, the financial services industry is the leading industry for self-made

billionaires (30%) with assets per billionaire in this sector averaging $4.5 billion.

However, research shows that Asian billionaires tend to be younger than other billionaires, with an average age of 57 years. This number is 10 years younger than American and European billionaires. Because a significant proportion of Asian billionaires grew up in poverty (25%) compared with 8% in the US and 6% in Europe.

Billionaires Preserve Their wealth

More than two-thirds of the world’s billionaires are over 60 years old and have more than one child. This means that the preservation of assets, the transfer of assets and the legacy are always a matter of concern for them. Research suggests that wealth declines over time, especially as families grow.

As billionaires get older, they face the difficult decision of what to do with the business that made them rich, keep or sell all or parts of the business.

The report shows that most billionaires in the US and Europe choose to keep their businesses as they are (60%), a third (30%) sell shares through initial public offerings (IPOs). or sell trades and withdraw 10% cash.

The majority of withdrawers become financial investors, investing on their own, seeking specific risk-reward goals and/or entrusting investments to family offices or personal financial advisors. 57% of European and 56% Asian billionaire families take over the family business when the patriarch/founder retires compared to 36% in the US.

Charity

Research shows that the philanthropic efforts of today’s billionaires, such as supporting education,

healthcare, and philanthropy, tend to focus on efforts that deliver tangible, measurable results.

They want to know how many people they have helped with their donation, see if their health

and living conditions have improved. In the US, “tangible philanthropy” donated through organizations is common.

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